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Jaime Wilson

Jaime Wilson

Jaime Wilson

In 2005, Jaime brought her love and knowledge of ancient architecture to the BAC. As part of her courses taught at the BAC, students explore the rich social and political context within which architecture is commissioned, designed, and built in order to understand how architecture often becomes a cultural document for ancient and later modern societies. To further explore the meaning of ancient architecture in a modern world, Jaime and her students have traveled to Greece, where they study first-hand the political and social motivations for preserving and restoring ancient buildings. In 1994 and 1995, Jaime excavated for the American School of Classical Studies in Athens, Greece. In 1995-1996 Jaime was the curatorial assistant for "The Fire of Hephaistos", an exhibit held at Harvard University's Sackler Museum, for which she received a Special Project Distinction Award. In 2000-2001, Jaime was part of the educational team at the Worcester Art Museum, conducting research for the exhibit "Antioch: the Lost City". She also was selected to be a member of the American School's 2001 summer academic program, in which students and teachers traveled to more than 125 archaeological sites in Greece to study the architecture and infrastructure of the ancient Greek world.

In early 2013, Jaime presented a paper titled, "The Labors of Herakles on the East Façade of the Temple to Hephaistos: A Symbol of Victory and Salvation for Christian Athens", at the Annual Meeting of the Archaeological Institute of America. The paper examined a community's response to the reuse of architecture within a new religious context. Jaime is currently working on her dissertation, which explores the social, political, and religious climate of Athens, Greece, in the Early Byzantine period, as evidenced through conversion of the city's pagan temples into Christian churches.